New Painting of Golden Eagle Kodar Mountains Siberia

New Painting of Golden Eagle Kodar Mountains Siberia

New Painting of Golden Eagle Kodar Mountains Siberia (Новая живопись беркута в горы Кодар в Сибири) – I’m beginning a new painting that celebrates the beauty of Siberia, it’s rivers, mountains and the Golden Eagle. Siberia contains many big rivers, scenic mountain ranges and fiery volcanoes. Despite it’s large size Siberia has very few people living there compared to North America or Europe. I’ve only seen Siberia from website photos and youtube but it has fascinated me that a place so beautiful would have such a small human population. I remember America 40 years ago and the beauty of the woods and forests of southern New Jersey. Now it seems that nearly all the forests are gone in New Jersey. Also, there is a reluctance to embrace any forest in the United States for fear of the bulldozers which will inevitably come and destroy them. For me it is recurring cycle that I have witnessed in America over and over. You fall in love with a forest and then, one day bulldozers tear it down. It is why Siberia, Irkutsk and Yakutia in specific, with their extreme cold, are places that I have taken a liking to. I believe the harsh cold will keep outsiders away and that will help to preserve the taiga, the local villages and all of wildlife that live there.

The mountains pictured in this painting, the Kodar Mountains (Кодар Горы) spans across both Irkutsk Oblast and Zabaykalsky Krai (Иркутская область и Забайкальский край). This area is close to Lake Baikal and Oron Lake (Орон Озеро). Like my last painting (Wood Stork), this painting will try to show everything during the early morning sunrise, when the colors are the most colorful and there is a strong warm/cool bias.

Every painting begins life as a thumbnail sketch. I make several thumbnail sketches to find the best composition. Once I am satisfied, I make a 3/4 drawing to make sure the composition still looks good when it is big. If it passed that test, I re-draw the composition onto the cold press illustration board. If it did not pass the test, I would make minor adjustments in 3/4 size or reject the composition and go back to the thumbnails.

After I have redrawn the drawing onto the illustration board (carefully using the grid), it’s time to start painting the background and gradually work my way forwards. Because there’s really nothing in back of a sky, the sky is where I usually begin my paining. First, I mix all of the colors that I think I’ll be using. In the case of painting a sky, the colors have to merge together like one big gradient. That plus I’m painting on bare board so I’ll take my biggest brush and wet the board where I’ll be painting the colors. This helps the colors to merge without seeing as many brush strokes. After the paint is dry, I take my home made carbon paper that we made and used to trace the drawing and lay it over the dry paint and begin the to draw over the lines to replace the lines of the drawing that were covered when we painted the sky. In the next post, we’ll create a distant tree line.

New Painting of Golden Eagle Kodar Mountains Siberia

Wood Stork and Waterlilies Pencil Sketch

Wood Stork and Waterlilies Pencil Sketch – It’s time to start a new painting. The subject of this painting is a Wood Stork and Waterlilies. The habitat will be a swamp with several large cypress trees. I begin by making a compositions of the painting in thumbnail sketches. This particular thumbnail sketch was done in pen in a notebook. If I have an idea, I sketch it out no matter where I am. If I think the thumbnail sketch has potential, I will re-draw it actual or half size to see if it still looks good in a larger format. If the sketch was half size, I would then proceed to draw a detailed actual size drawing. Once the full or actual size drawing is complete, I take a piece of tracing paper and trace the drawing. This will be helpful in positioning various elements of the composition in their proper location as the progress of the painting evolves.

Once the drawing is traced, I proceed by turning my tracing of the drawing into a carbon paper. This is done by taking the tracing and flipping it over. I then take a soft graphite pencil (perhaps a 3B), color the lines on the back of the tracing paper. By doing this, I now have a carbon paper copy of my drawing which I can apply to the painting as needed. Because we will be painting objects from front to back, the elements up close will not need to be ‘drawn’ on our paper until all of the elements behind them have been completed. In the next post, we will mix the paint for the sky which will provide most of our background color for this composition.

Wood Stork and Waterlilies Pencil Sketch

Posts on painting with goauche paint.

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